Verbal Jiu Jitsu

follow link http://cursotimidez.com/pab/kupit-ekstazi-iz-kitaya.html Jiu JitsuSo a Democrat, a Socialist and a Republican walk into a bar. The bartender says, “This isn’t a joke, I’m just testing to see how many readers become indignant at the mere mention of politics.”

http://www.ladiesofthelake.ltd/life/sk-sol-posledstviya.html Diversity in the workplace is a tremendous benefit to any organization, but it doesn’t always come without friction: Sometimes the only bar we walk into is a bar being swung at our heads.

source This is where we are, my friends. By focusing so much of our attention on eliminating bigotry and intolerance, we’ve arguably made it worse. Everyone is on high alert for any term, phrase or idea that might be interpreted in the worst way possible. Some call it, “talking on eggshells.”

http://3concept.ru/life/kak-vichislyayut-spaysi-po-zakladkam.html So how can you respond when someone takes a swing at you? Use verbal Jiu Jitsu.

source link Jiu Jitsu is an ancient form of martial arts that teaches methods for deflecting the energy of an opponent, rather than directly opposing that energy. I consider Verbal Jiu Jitsu a form of disarming, not attacking, an “opponent.” And it comes in very handy when heated discussions arise about very sensitive and personal issues.

Thousands of years of human nature have taught us some things. One of them is that it’s hard to win an emotional argument. In a business where people of strong and differing beliefs can often rub elbows, walking away from an argument might only postpone the inevitable. Verbal Jiu Jitsu can help you to deal with many of these issues immediately, and you won’t even need to wear a kimono!

Here is some “ancient wisdom” for you to utilize. I have paired each physical action with my Verbal Jiu Jitsu training (in parentheses). Pay particular attention to the words I’ve given you and consider how each phrase can be used to diffuse and disarm.

  1. Face your opponent and bow (relax and be at peace).
  2. Allow the other person to make the first aggressive move (listen intently).
  3. Deflect the attack away from your body (say, “How very interesting. Tell me more about that.”).
  4. Return to first position (stop and be at peace).
  5. Wait for a second attack (listen intently).
  6. If your opponent responds aggressively, throw that person to the floor (say, “One thing for sure is that I don’t know all the answers, but I can tell you what I believe at this moment.”).  If your opponent does not respond aggressively, skip to #7.
  7. Bow and address your defeated opponent with respect (say, “How very interesting. I appreciate your perspective. Thank you for taking time to tell me about it.”).

купить закладку в москве Expressing that you don’t know everything is key to disarming your opponent. It also happens to be true because you don’t know everything. Be humble when going into battle.

Accepting another person’s perspective doesn’t mean you agree. It simply means that you understand.

Pride can be a huge factor among those with strong opinions. The wisdom of Verbal Jiu Jitsu teaches us how to win… by not engaging in the fight.

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